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will be on this massive, $60.3 trillion debt, this fiscal cliff. but, most importantly, this debt crisis next year. i'm not talking about what's going to happen in february or january. what i want to talk about is how do we solve this problem? how do we get the speaker? and the president actually opened up that back door. they're sitting there making back room deals. open up and let the american people see what's going on. i want to see what's going on. they won't tell either side what the deal-making is going on. i don't think that's the way to make policy. >> now, as you said, you and i may not agree. we've debated on this show, though you've always come on. are you saying that you believe that speaker boehner has a score card and is punishing you and three others for standing up and voting for what you believe to be right? >> that is apparently the case. we wrote a letter to the speaker and i think if you read the language of the letter, you walk through all of the washington and you see oh, yes, there was a score card and we were graded a certain way, graded down because we wanted to balance the
and say we didn't go off the fiscal cliff and the debt goes from $16 trillion to $20 trillion a couple years down the road to $25 trillion. nothing changes in washington, dc. you tax. you still spend. maybe it is time to take the medicine congressman and go over the fiscal cliff and fix the problem. >>guest: there is no fiscal cliff. there is a fiscal slope. the earth doesn't stop spinning, the sun will come up, the moon will come up and we will have to do things in john. taxes will go up and the democratic party and hopefully some responsible republicans will vote to make certain that we remove this tax cut that would take place. >>eric: no talk about responsible democrats to stop spending so were, or cut back the spending, not just cutting back the increase rate in spending but item spending cuts. >>guest: the rate of increase doesn't have anything to do with the spain people are suffering whether they are middle class or poor. we were talking about the so-called fiscal cliff, if that happens, automatically taxes are going to go up for everyone. maybe, then, someone would ask, who wa
a function of doing both of the things you talk about, joe. having an agreement to avoid the debt, the fiscal cliff, and then having a down payment on actually getting the $4 trillion identified. >> howard dean is a deficit hawk. liberal, but he is a deficit hawk. he doesn't say maybe if we can't get a deal together, maybe we'd be okay with the fiscal cliff. he says that is the best deal for everyone, the best deal for progressives, just to do it. to go back to the clinton era rates. you get rid of three quarters of the deficit just on tax increases at that point. >> and he says you get defense cuts. >> you can't get defense cuts any other way. and he's not the only one. there's a lot of people on the left and there's quite a few people on the right. i'm glad you're optimistic and a lot of ceos and guys in your position -- if you run a company, you don't need consumers petrified and business people petrified. this is the last thing we need if you run a company. i understand you have a horse in the game. >> but you also have the double trigger. if you go over the cliff, we've got the debt ceil
for digging into this stuff. we've got the debate about the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling and we're talking in the trillions. before you can even get to the trillions, if you can't stop stuff like this, does the american public ever believe that washington is going to get its act together if you can't stop this 100,000 here, million there, all, of course, adds up to billions. if we can't stop the zombies, taxpayers paying for the zombies, how can we ever tackle medicare and social security? [laughter] megyn: that's the thing that makes people upset, julie. all right, if you're going to increase my taxes to help pay down the debt, help people in need, that's one thing, but if i'm going to be paying for zombies or for santa to ride the $250,000 sleigh, i object. >> i'm a little embarrassed. can you imagine being an employee and having to pretended to be a zombie? >> those were actors. >> i don't know about that. [laughter] i think they may have been dhs employees dressed up. charles is right, thanksgiving a little ri -- this is a little ridiculous. i understand what they're trying
us from going off the fiscal cliff. they said by the way we need to raise the debt limit and this new proposal of eliminating congress from the process of raising the debt limit. >> senator mcconnell has offered to have an up or down vote on this and democrats haven't taken him up on it. all of the spending reductions that simon cited in the 1990s were tied to the debt limit increase. it gives republicans leverage. president obama has the leverage in the fiscal cliff fight. he's willing to let the tax go up on the middle class. on the debt increase he doesn't have the same leverage. bob woodward pointed out that tim geithner said to president obama if the republicans stick to their guns on the debt limit bill you cannot reto it. the consequences will be so clam to us that you cannot veto it. so obama would have capitulated. megyn: that's what simon is saying now. that we shouldn't put the country in that position. >> the only way we'll get action on this debt. we keep spending and spending and raising our debt by $6 trillion every obama term. that's what catastrophic. the republicans
in the debt ceiling debate or the fiscal cliff negotiations that neither side will give and they're both being unreasonable. and really not drilling down. the other thing they do is they really go back to newt gingrich and grover norquist. as you've talked about both these things, changing the culture of washington and making compromise impossible. >> here's something really naughty, i think in terms of policy. who can forget back in august not a million years ago when the romney pollster neil newhow said the following. we're not going to let our campaign be kick a at a timed by fact checkers. think about that. fact checkers meaning facts. >> right. >> i was on the show with you the other night. we talked about the quotes of the year. 47%. >> that's a good one. >> i thought this should be the top two of three. that showed their view towards reality. it was an arrogance that we can say whatever we want to say. and i think in years past, this is what's changed. campaigns would not be so brazen. if caught in a lie they maybe feel some shame. here's neil newhouse telling reporters that we don't ca
: if this is not addressed in the fiscal cliff debate, will it come up in the debt ceiling debate? guest: all of this depends on how the fiscal cliff sorts itself out. yesterday, you have senators say we want on income benefits extended. if the fiscal cliff debate is only limited to tax rates and deficit reduction, and not the debt ceiling, this will come up again. president obama once the debt ceiling to be part of this agreement. the reason why is simple, because that is where republicans have leverage in february. he needs republicans to extend the debt ceiling for the government to function with all going into default. republicans know this, and in theory they could separate the two to maximize their leverage. host: time for a couple more calls in this segment of the "washington journal," we will continue the unemployment insurance discussion in the following segment. laura is in louisville, kentucky, on the independent line. caller: good morning. what bothers me is when people say they actually can not find work and they have been on unemployment for 20 months, whatever they can get, and i will tell you
it will not happen, no vote today on the debt ceiling, fiscal cliff proposal to basically the breaking news is we're back where we started. melissa: what is the hottest stock on wall street these days. trading under. the bidding war for my favorite bank analyst. i love dick bove. speaker he is in purgatory. a billion dollars unauthorized trade was described as a rogue trader. presumption of innocence, he was arrested earlier in the week. take the firm, the firm has been closed down since then. dick bove has been in purgatory. sources are telling us bove reseed essentially 17 offers to join him, he is now down to five, he has contracted form in five firms. he believes he'll be making the decision on which of these five firms he will go to in the coming days. he says he is close to a deal to revitalize the firm, said he would stay with rockdale. if i tell you this. said he is t has to make up itsd soon, did not say which way he was going. my gut talking to people what he is probably going to leave. who are they? these are midsize firms who basically know he is a well-known analyst. he opened stores
to the economy. we're going to have a fight on the fiscal cliff. another on the debt ceiling. it's destroying confident in the markets and what bothers me, larry, you know the subprime crisis hit like that. there was no warning. we could have another one like that. >> somebody has to control spending. i think the debt ceiling over a period of time is one way to do it. i'm sorry to you both. i have to get out of here. >> only roughly 800 billion apart. they can come together and solve it. >> i think the main tax -- >> for the good of the country. i'm probably not going to like the deal but that's probably what will happen. >> thank you so much. quick programming note. i will come to you life from our nation's capital tomorrow night as part of cnbc's special all day coverage. rise above, mission critical. now how do you like this scenario? the u.s. government using our tax money to build up an electric battery firm but after it fails the company sells out to a chinese outfit who takes advantage of our own taxpayer dollars. now producing for japan. there is something wrong with this picture. we'
tax. host: how would you compare the current talks to july 2011 and the debt limit, fiscal cliff, sequestration -- guest: the debt limit talks definitely set the stage for this. they were not completely without value. i get the sense it is a lot more serious now. it has almost been like a year- and-a-half long negotiation. with the real deadline being the expiration of the bush tax cuts at the end of this year. to some extent, now they're getting to the real deadline and it is more serious. host: have you written one of the, if we go over the cliff, this is what happens-type article? guest: yes. people would probably start feeling it in their paychecks pretty quickly. never mind what it means to the broader economy. it will hit. it will hurt a lot of people. if we did not change the law and it went one month, two months, three months, it could lead to another recession because there be such a sharp drop in people's incomes and it would be spending less. that would not be good for businesses. i do not think that is quite to happen. -- going to happen. host: caller, last word with
of coffee this morning. starbucks ceo has sobering advice to offer on the looming fiscal cliff, that the consequences will be far worse than last year's debt ceiling fight when the u.s. credit rating was downgraded for the first time ever. his message to lawmakers, now is not the time to play politics. it's about doing right by the american people. >> i think if people would get in the room and leave their ego behind, and not be so skewed towards the party but be so sensitive to the lens of the american people, we will have an agreement. >> poppy harlow is joining us with more. we've been talking about how this will affect us. schultz says this goes way beyond our boarders. >> it's global. something that stuck with me talking to him about this, the people who need a deal most will be hurt the most. here's why. >> this single issue has a seismic affect on the rest of the world, that we have never been as connected and the domino effect of a bad outcome here will have significant negative consequences, domestically and around the world, not the least of which will be the level --
reducing the deficit and the debt and the current issue is the fiscal cliff. that would be the worst fiscal policy put in place since the great depression when we put an austerity policy in place to send and through the country back into recession. the idea that we have got into a debate as to how to reduce the deficit is wrong. we say don't reduce the deficit now this fast. that is what the fiscal cliff is all about and that's why ben bernanke cannot put the phrase. guest: as exactly right, we have two very different problems. the only reason we're talking about the second issue is politics. this is the politics of the moment tromping economic common sense which is a dangerous combination. guest: the fiscal solution is a fig leaf to allow members of congress to say we're going to spend so the spending cuts and tax increases and let the deficit be $500 billion higher. host: the debt is at $16.30 trillion and has increased $4 trillion over the last four years. the present and congress will say that over the next 10 years, we will get it back to where was in 2009, correct? guest: that is fund
with our debt bomb. giev tot face the fiscal cliff that's coming in a couple of weeks. >> so you know what both sides are saying. the president is saying there's no way to make the math work without raising the rates for the top income earners and that the republicans should give in on this. >> yeah, yeah. >> do you think he's right? >> well, i understand that position. that was the position he took during the campaign. but what has to happen in my view, you've got to have everything on the table. yo view to have revenue increases. now, how you get those revenue increases was an item of discussion during the campaign. it are be an item of discussion during the negotiation. i for one think you could get there in way that would promote economic growth by eliminating -- by bronding the tax base, by eliminating loopholes and deductions. the truth of the matter, fareed, is we're not undertaxed as americans. we overspend. i think everybody would agree we overspend. that's why we have this debt to gdp over 100%. fars as the eye can see, absence poultcy changes. whatever you do, you first have to
over the fiscal cliff. but where do you invest if there is a debt deal? some smart strategies with your stock picks coming up. one area of those fiscal cliff negotiations that is getting very little attention but could have a major ramification for you and your kids is the estate tax. we will drill down on the future of the inheritance tax. and the other side of google, the internet giant slashing bills -- stashes, i should say, billions in tax shelters to avoid paying taxes. is that fair play or is it absolutely outrageous? we'll talk about that at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. now back to scott and the fast money "halftime report." >> over the weekend johnny manziel made history as the first freshman to win the heisman trophy and with a great nickname to go along with his great story it would seem as though the sky is the limit for the kid they call johnny football. our brian shactman is live in new york city with the texas a&m qb. brian? >> they call him johnny heisman now, too. only the fifth player ever in college football to throw for more than 3,000 yards and run for at least 1,000. jo
to just worrying about the debt and the fiscal cliff and such. our program today, i am welcoming you. joan walker will welcome you as well. ed reilly will give the polling results, and ron brown will do the interview and then we will have a panel discussion. it will be a terrific day. please turn these babies off. again, welcome. joan walker is executive vice president of allstate. joan has been a terrific partner with us over the last four years. she is responsible for all relations for allstate. prior to joining that company, she did similar work with monsanto. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what this town of washington is all about. that you very much, and welcome our friends here. [applause] >> ok, good morning, and thank you so much for that kind introduction. "the atlantic" and "national journal" have been terrific partners in this effort. i thank them very much for that, and many thanks to edward reilly, who will take us through the data today, and also for jeremy, an associate, who was the lead researcher on the poll. we have interviewed 25,00
're fiscally bankrupt, we didn't have the dollar, we might be greece, we have got to deal with our debt bomb, we have got to face the fiscal cliff that's coming in a couple of weeks. >> so you know what both sides are saying? the president is saying there's no way to make the math work. without raising the rates for the top income earners and that the republicans should give on this. >> yeah. >> do you think he's right? >> well, i understand that position, that was the position he took during the campaign. but what has to happen in my view, you've got to have everything on the table, you have to have revenue increases. now how you get those to revenue increases was an item of discussion during the campaign, and it's an item more negotiation, i for one think you can get there by eliminating and broadeninging the tax base which eliminating loopholes and deductions. the truth of the matter is that we're not undertaxed as americans, we overspend. i think everything would agree that we overspend that's why we have this debt to gdp of 100% as far as the eye can see absent policy changes, so whatev
-term debt crisis, the so-called fiscal cliff, and i hope that we will, the debt in the years to come will increasingly dominate the budget. it will pressure defense and a in a serious way. so without addressing the long-term tenure solution as the animal outline, the defense budget is going to be under increasing pressure. that is inevitable and the interest rates have not even started going up, which is also inevitable at some point. the third one a month make is that the problems within the internal defense budget and the dynamics of this budget also make the problem more difficult and more complicated. it also requires a longer term to address some of these calls. first of all, the rising health care costs, and retirement costs and fuel inefficiency. each of those has their own complexities, but all are important. so the budget is going to have to be addressed, even if the topline is the one that is a rational topline. in other words, we have entitlements within the defense budget now which are comparable to the entitlements and all the snow we have to deal with outside the defens
fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff type scenario with the debt limit that credited the scenario that led to this, and this idea i voted against that, put bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. well, surprise, it didn't work. here we are, again, facing this. we have two issues to face. number one is in the immediate term avoid doing damage, and avoid doing harm, and so we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short term. we have to, we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talk about that. it's fundamentally true. spending a trillion dollars a year more than we take in. that's a fact. address it. i approach the issue with a following belief that the only way to get that in order is through rapid economic growth. there's no taxes you can raise to bring this debt down. what the president's proposing does not raise the revenue to make a significant dent on the debt, but it will make a didn't on job creation, particularly middle class job creation, and that's w
-span web page dedicated to the fiscal cliff. the combined things related to the issues. it is all at cspan.or g/fiscalcliff we will have a discussion about change and how u.s. debt, economic growth, and retirement of baby boomers could lead to political and economic change. >> the house returns tomorrow. members will be coming in to consider defense department programs for next year. we will have live coverage of the house tomorrow at 2:00 eastern right here on c-span. >> i think people still love discovery. the ability to find surprises. every month or every year, people are suddenly talking about some show. you could've said to me, mike, i want you to choose honey boo boo, or a certain food channel network. i do not think if i had to determine that, i ever would -- at the ability to stumble on them, and then double around and that and find, i sort of like honey boo boo, that is a huge part of the american television experience. i think it is sold short when its techno ecstatic. i think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and passivity and being able to roam around the tv ju
turn to the rest. >> right now we are facing a fiscal cliff. last year we were facing the debt ceiling. before that, we were looking at several potential government shutdowns. at a different level, the appropriations process has not worked as intended for years. neither has the budget process. it seems like abnormal is the normal. that type of activity in this situation where we are already looking ahead to the next potential showdown, as he suggested, with the next debt ceiling altercation, this creates uncertainty, which is not good for the private sector and certainly is not good for the federal government in terms of its ability to function in a normal way. how can congress break out of this? >> do what we are hired to do and to appropriations in a timely manner. in maryland, we have a lot of defense contractors very concerned about sequester. many of them say, warner, warner, a nuisance and-bowles. -- do simpson-bowles. everyone supports it, but no one has read it. but the top line numbers are almost the same -- next time you do a default, do not make it so awful. putting a gun to
of santa barbara. we have gone over the fiscal cliff here in california. we are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. if the democratic party is so good, then why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time the unions, instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns give that money back to the membership so they can maybe pay their own wages and tax bears and people like me that live on fixed incomes don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we have worked hard to make? guest: you have worked hard. number one, i cannot comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. reports are that things are starting to turn around a little over there. it's tough to pass a budget if when you have the fiscal majority requirement. second, how we got here, it's not unions. wages for americans have been going down the past 115 years. people are not keeping up with inflation. the average american worker has taken a 2011 pay cut when you compare what they made 10 years ago to what they're making now. -- $200
tempered by debt ceiling worries, fiscal cliff worries. we know there will be a little bit less money in the economy because even if we get a deal, we know tax rates are going up. so i wonder, even if a deal with done, i wonder how much umph the market -- it really gets from that knowing that we're headed into just troubled waters for most of 2013, i would say. there's this notion we have all this trillions of dollars on corporate balance sheets. and it's just going to be unleashed. i wonder how much that's offset by the damage already being done. >> no, certainly, and that may be priced in just like you said. but i do think we will see a bump up here on the equity markets and some thin volume. hopefully we see santa claus reality, but to speak specifically to be shorter investment, if you see some type of resolution, there will be a knee jerk reaction. look at the s&p level, 1460. we could go test that in two days, joe. it's not that far away from where we're at right now. >> you just look at what's happening in apple, all the people that have gains there, they're almost ignoring val
ceiling orificical cliff. it was the debt ceiling. >> steve: first fiscal cliff of our lifetime. >> gretchen: it feels like it has been here a longg time and they were talking about the importance of the day to get the bill actually through. i feel like they can jump through hoops and get past that, too. >> eric: had it has to originate in the house and sent over marked up to the senate and point being there is a lot of hoop to jump through. you know. rudy guiliani is on hannity last night. he was approached with the same sort of problem in new york city . listen to how he handled it >> i was given a report that said you have to raise taxes and said nothing about reducing spending. i was not an economic expert. i became one after becoming mayor in new york. i said it makes no sense. if i raises tax now. i will have to do it in two or four years. i will try to do something different. lower taxings. i in the beginning but a little bit and two or three years lower taxings. we had a three billion surplus and unemployment dropped from 10.5 to six percent . the city was humming. bowle
on the fiscal cliff. this morning a leading republican said any deal should include the major drivers of our debt. >> the long-term indebtedness of this country is baby boomers retiring putting pressure on medicaid, medicare and social security. i hope my party will look out for the country and not just the party itself and pure this president to do something he has never done before, lead in a bipartisan way. >> reporter: a little swipe there at the end but republicans have been consistent that it is important to address entitlement reform, something they very much want on the table if we're going to have a big deal in this fiscal cliff matter. jon? jon: on the democratic side it seems like they are holding firm on being sure that there is additional tax revenue in any fiscal cliff deal, right? >> jon, no question about that. they have been consistent from the very beginning. the president ran on the upper income americans paying more taxes as part of this deal. we heard more from chuck schumer on "fox news sunday". >> we democrats realize that there have to be two sides to this bargain but
continues to pursue. >> we have a short-run problem, purely a political problem about this fiscal cliff. it has nothing to do with the bondholder and the debt. we should work on that. >>> we got to take a break. lots more roundtable. >>> why did the tea party star quit the senate. what does it mean for the gop? >>> what's next for hillary? twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. that retiring some day is even an option for sean and me. how'd you get comfortable enough to know you could really do it? well, planning, of course. and we got a lot of good advice. a few years ago, your mom and i put some money into a pacific life fixed annuity. it guarantees us an income for the rest of our lives, whether social security is all there or not. hey, hey!
and decided to roll a debt ceiling extension in to the fiscal cliff deal whatever they end up striking here and seems to me acknowledging republicans have leverage with cpi and talking about raising the medicare age. my question to you as a progressive is, republicans want something big. is there any big concessions you can see acceptable? >> new york city i really can't. and the kind of things we are talking about, even if they're not -- may not be acceptable to me ever but talking about a version of the changed cpi, the president already said social security is off the table because it is not driving the deficit. that's kind of weird. changes to medicare eligibility again or changes to medicare payments or whatever, it's really complicated to negotiate but i have to say i agree with you, steve. i'm -- i wish that the president hadn't taken the 14th amendment off the table because we're all saying, well, nothing should be off the table. why is that off the table and even if it's tough thing to pull off in the long run? i think that this mania for a fiscal cliff deal is disturbing but i thi
that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the fiscal cliff. second, raising the treasury debt ceiling, which as you know is becoming an issue rarely soon. third, achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. that is deficit reduction and tax increases and spending cuts that allow the gdp ratio to stabilize by the end of the decade. these three things need to be done now. in terms of the fiscal cliff, if policy is unchanged and we go over the cliff and there is still no change after that, the gdp in 2013 will 3.5 percentage points. subtract that and that is a severe recession. cbo and others are probably us are underestimating how severe that will be because confidence is very weak. it is unclear how the reserve would response to this. we need to scale back from the cliff. at the very minimum, the cliff needs to be scaled back so it is only a hit to gdp at 1.5 percentage points at most. if you have more of a drive than that, it it becomes it. the economy will weaken. the budget deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would ar
with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
this first agreement and we avoid the fiscal cliff, we get into next year, there will be a debt limit fight, that might be less intense if they can get through this one. and the republicans will come up with a new way to talk about big spending cuts in return for some entithe entitlement changes. >> ben, thank you for stopping by. >> thank you. >> this morning, i was thinking to myself, self, if we get a deal, what would the market reaction be to a deal? >> that isn't -- >> because you can really make the case for either way, a selloff or a rally. >> i think the way the market sets up right now, the fact that we continue to sort of push towards this 14 and a quarter level leads me to believe that people are believing there's a deal that's some what imminent and we're going to rachet our way up. but my push-back would be, i mean, a deal, it's not buy their. my sense is, u.s. going forward, whatever deal is made there are going to be serious cuts to serious things. though a deal -- a deal that comes out in terms of the media, it's going to be positive for the market. the aftermath, it won't b
of waste that we need to focus in on. the president is trying to solve the fiscal cliff, we are trying to solve the debt and the deficit. jenna: you have a fresh look at things. what do you think the leadership that exists now that is negotiating this that may be more entrenched in politics than you have been, what kind of advice would you give them. >> we are able to say to leadership and the leadership is able to listen from their own constituents instead, i'm from central oklahoma. the key thing that comes up over and over again is we have to deal with the debt and deficit. we hear the noise of that maybe closer to the ground and that is a good thing to be able to share. when you've got a trillion dollars of over spending we've got to deal with a trillion dollars of over spending. jenna: you came in fresh in 2010, you signed up for a second turn at this. >> there are a few things left to lee solve, let's get on with them. jen congratulations on a second term. thanks for coming into the studio. jon: a murder in broad daylight on a busy street in manhatten. new york police are releasi
revenue, this fiscal cliff issue much larger. talks about the debt ceiling and what that means for next year. treasury saying that sometime early next year they will run out of those extraordinary measures and the u.s. will have to raise the debt ceiling or default. back to you. ashley: very good point. rich edson in d.c. thanks very much. tracy: our next guest says, forget taxes. washington needs to focus on cutting entitlement spending if we want to prevent a battle between old and young americans. diana further got roth, senior fellow at man hat taken institute and joins us now. diana, seems to me raising the retirement age is the simplest thing you could do yet we're not talking about that. >> well, we certainly should be because part of the deficit problem, a great part, is entitlements, social security and medicare, keep adding fiscal burdens as people's live expectancy increases and it's great that people are living longer but when social security was first thought of the life expectancy was only 67. now it is around 85. we need to raise retirement ages or somehow thinking about
of the fiscal cliff. a voice of reason on the debt deal. and tuesday it's mission critical time. "squawk" goes to washington to talk with senators and congressman involved in negotiations. "squawk box" starting at 6:00 a.m. eastern. year-end event. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2
there and avoid the fiscal cliff. all the congresspeople believe their job is to cut the debt and deficit. that really sets us up for disappointment, unfortunately. we've had a pretty good run here in the market, so, i think it's going to be tough sledding. >> as you see there, the dow, first five-day winning streak since march. it seems like the market is pricing in everything, but everything will get resolved, get more qe, get a deal by the end of the year and it seems like maybe now, the risk is actually to the down side. >> well, i actually sold a couple of things today, one of them cummins, had a nice run, after some disappointing earnings, just because i feel like it's run so much, so much, you know, euphoria is priced in. i'm not optimistic they'll come up with something in time for the christmas break, but -- i don't know how the market is going to react to it so i can't -- i'm not able to think two steps ahead, what will happen and how will the market react, so, you know, i just got to trade around, value orientations, not around what i think -- >> fundamentals. that's crazy, kar
and getting that. >> it's a statement. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. also on the radar this morning, after president obama and house speaker john boehner both were tight-lipped how the negotiations went. the co-founder of the fix the debt campaign, he was asked about the chances of striking a deal to avoid the cliff. >> it's probably more like a 40% chance we'll actually get it done before the end of the year. probably 25% chance we'll get it done right after the end of the year. and then there's that horrible 35% chance that we'll still go over the cliff and have pure chaos. but i think the chances of getting it done now are better. i think that's what's key. >> be sure to tune in tomorrow for the fiscal cliff coverage live from washington. mission critical, rise above d.c., all day long. becky quick, jim cramer, maria bartiromo holding their feet to the fire about where they stand on the fiscal cliff and how they'll do their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal. now, there are some bowles comments. 40%, yeah, but the odds are much better. they're still 35% chance
to gdp. now, we don't want to get there that we. the same way we don't want to go over the fiscal cliff. in other words, the fiscal cliff is a big austerity. we get $7 trillion in the deficit reduction over the last ten years. but you don't do it the way we want to do it. when it comes to the baseline, we have to work together as part of an agreement to get the right baseline but that doesn't mean it is not for real world deficit reduction. it is. does it mean that it's better than the current law? maybe not. but there is an agreement that in the fiscal cliff is not the best way. >> we could add the baseline. the deficit to gdp. >> you said the deficit. >> you look at the current line baseline and get under 1% of deficit to gdp. >> seven years and 7 trillion of debt reduction. if anybody wants to read more about, please look at that space on what it takes. i thank you all for being here today. one reason we have to end it is that these people are going to be so instrumental in getting us out of this mess that we have to get them back to work. >> , come thank you. [applause] >> more abou
discover, is worry about the debt and the fiscal cliff. our program today, just briefly, others will talk, and we will give the polling results, and then a senior national journal member will have a panel discussion. it is a terrific day, i think. please turn these off. and, again, i welcome you. joan is the executive vice president of the country's largest insurance. you are in good hands with all state. joan has been a terrific partner. she is responsible of corporate relations for allstate. she did civil -- similar work with monsanto and others. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what washington is all about, so thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> ok. thank you. john, for that introduction. the national journal has been a terrific partner in supporting our work and the challenges that the american middle-class has been facing during this great recession, and i thank them for that. many thanks also to end, who will take us through the polling data to date -- many thanks take us through the polling data today, as well as one of his associates
should compromise and hear both sides. >> i think you should go off the fiscal cliff. americans are barreling down the road that's debt. there is a fork in the road. on the left are all our kids and our grand kids and the next generations. and on the right the road on the right is the fiscal cliff. really that the is choice if we don't do something about it we are going to go anyway. do you run over the kids with the car or do you take the other road which is not a good one but better than running over your kids fiscal cliff. it's a hard choice. >> but if we don't do it, if we don't go over the fiscal cliff the democrats will never cut a dime in spending. >> why would the democrats want change? if the bush tax cuts are going to expire they are saying this is great because this means the rich are going to pay more money, we are going to have more money to spend. they are already spending a the lo. they are saying why would we want change? this is great we have more money to spend. >> nancy pelosi saying why aren't we voting on middle class tax cuts? get to the other stuff. put th
. congress had trouble putting together a deal. now the u.s. may be heading for the fiscal cliff. what does that mean for you and your investments? we have the jobs report today for a brief moment. we weren't worried about the fiscal cliff. now, we are back. what do you make of it? >> the jobs report was okay. there are some signs of very modest improvement in jobs. the good news is we have not really lost momentum and i will put that in the victory column. from a very short-term perspective, it is the fiscal cliff that is on everyone's mind. consumer sentiment is starting to decline. that suggested everyone seems to be focused on the fiscal cliff. when you are focused on uncertainty, what do you do, you do nothing. those are the major implementations for the economy. cheryl: i can hear the hesitancy in your voice. a lot of our guests are saying the same thing. they are afraid of what washington will do or maybe not do. your outlook is a bit more bullish than some of your colleagues. what are you saying in the second half of 2013 that others are not? >> on a very short-term basis, we have n
can fix the fiscal cliff. we're going to hype -- i can't wait for the debt ceiling now. man is that going to be something, too. that's going to be our next thing. >> constant entertainment. >> oh, talk about it. >> you've got -- you think this is brinksmanship. when is the deadline? i can't wait. >> it's february, right? the beginning of february. >> what's the slogan for that? >> let me come up with that. >> negotiate up. >> we don't want this to end with the fiscal cliff. we got -- and it won't. anyway -- >> how about the s&p 500? >> coming up the hunt for yield at times of uncertainty. institutional investors looking for alternatives to the lower return on fixed income. we're going to talk to the north carolina treasurer and the co-founder of investment firm cambridge associated. >> over president barack obama's first term the federal debt to gdp ratio increased over 19%. it is projected to increase over 20% by the end of his second term. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and y
the fiscal cliff. one element of this is are republicans going to be in this position, once again, to take the debt ceiling and the good faith and credit the u.s. hostage? president obama says we can't be in that position, again. and you are described, you, the press says, well, he said, listen. this is extraordinary. you ought to be talking about the damage caused by -- >> there's no doubt on this debt ceiling issue. look, this is part of the negotiations, this is in the middle of the, sort of the three tiered. they have a better chance of agreeing on taxes and entitlements than the debt ceiling. boehner who himself may agree, if we can't have this fight again because the business community will absolutely go crazy about it. he's got to bring back a political tool or some piece of victory. >> i would say, chuck, actually, the reporting now is better than it was a year ago. and some of what's happened is i think reporters have come to realize and many even republicans around that it's a party that went from being a conservative party to being a radical party and they're now struggling over
. 25 days now until america goes over the fiscal cliff if nothing happens. congress still in a political stalemate. the house of representatives are taking the weekend off. when it comes to solving our debt problems, we know where both parties stand but what about the people who will have to live with the decisions? what do americans, average americans, want to see in a fiscal cliff deal? steve leisman here now with our exclusive results of the cnbc all-america economic survey. what do americans want, steve? >> what you would expect. free stuff, tyler. actually, no, we'll get into that in a second. first we want to show you results of our december cnbc all-america survey. what we asked about the fiscal cliff. the first thing we wanted to establish is do people know about this thing? we looked at some of the other times we've asked this. what we'll see right here is other situations where they knew it, where other main stories that were out there. for example, the trayvon martin shooting. 91% of americans knew about that. occupy wall street, 80%. going forward what you have
is standing in the way now of a fiscal cliff solution. we're back in two. >>> it wasn't until the debt ceiling lauz but born with an . >> you know, i beg to differ, mr. president. to me, i understand the use of its is a weapon but to me the real problem isn't the debt ceiling. it's the debt. the debt is the problem. you know, to have an unlimited amount of money to call upon is too much power power for one person. it's always in our country been about checks and balances but i think this administration just wants more checks and no balancing of the checkbook. that isn't the kind of check and balance that i think the people that wrote the constitution had in mind. now, let's look at it a different way, when we think of, you know, some good entertainment, there's, you know, bob hope, the road to morocco, the road to singapore. i don't think that we want to have a movie someday called the road to the weimar republic because bob hope was in the old movies. there's no hope in that new movie and i think this issue really has to be discussed. now i understand there's issues about compromise and every
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